Archive for September, 2012

Open-Closed Principle

The Open/Closed Principle (OCP)

“Software entities (classes, modules, functions, etc.) should be open for extension but closed for modification.” [APPP]

When the requirements of an application changes, if the application confirms to OCP, we can extend the existing modules with new behaviours to satisfy the changes (Open for extension). Extending the behaviour of the existing modules does not result in changes to the source code of the existing modules (Closed for modification). Other modules that depends on the extended modules are not affected by the extension. Therefore we don’t need to recompile and retest them after the change. The scope of the change is localised and much easier to implement.

The key of OCP is to place useful abstractions (abstract classes/interfaces) in the code for future extensions. However it is not always obvious that what abstractions are necessary. It can lead to over complicated software if we add abstractions blindly. I found Robert C Martin’s “Fool me once” attitude very useful. I start my code with minimal number of abstractions. When a change of requirements takes place, I modify the code to add an abstraction and protect myself from future changes of the similar kind.

I recently implemented a simple module that sends messages and made a series of changes to it afterward. I feel it is a good example of OCP to share.

At the beginning, I created a MessageSender that is responsible to convert an object message to a byte array and send it through a transport.

package com.thinkinginobjects;

public class MessageSender {

	private Transport transport;

	public synchronized void send(Message message) throws IOException{
		byte[] bytes = message.toBytes();
		transport.sendBytes(bytes);
	}
}

After the code was deployed to production, we found out that we sent messages too fast that the transport cannot handle. However the transport was optimised for handling large messages, I modified the MessageSender to send messages in batches of size of ten.

package com.thinkinginobjects;

public class MessageSenderWithBatch {

	private static final int BATCH_SIZE = 10;

	private Transport transport;

	private List buffer = new ArrayList();

	private ByteArrayOutputStream byteStream = new ByteArrayOutputStream();

	public MessageSenderWithBatch(Transport transport) {
		this.transport = transport;
	}

	public synchronized void send(Message message) throws IOException {
		buffer.add(message);
		if (buffer.size() == BATCH_SIZE) {
			sendBuffer();
		}
	}

	private void sendBuffer() throws IOException {
		for (Message each : buffer) {
			byte[] bytes = each.toBytes();
			byteStream.write(bytes);
		}
		byteStream.flush();
		transport.sendBytes(byteStream.toByteArray());
		byteStream.reset();
	}

}

The solution was simple but I hesitated to commit to it. There were two reasons:

  1. MessageSender class need to be modified if we change how messages are batched in the future. It violated the Open-Closed Principle.
  2. MessageSender had secondary responsibility to batch messages in addition to the responsibility of convert/delegate messages. It violated the Single Responsibility Principle.

Therefore I created a BatchingStrategy abstraction, who was solely responsible for deciding how message are batched together. It can be extended by different implementations if the batch strategy changes in the future. In another word, the module was open for extensions of different batch strategy. The MessageSender kept its single responsibility that converting/delegating messages, which means it does not get modified if similar changes happen in the future. The module was closed for modification.

package com.thinkinginobjects;

public class MessageSenderWithStrategy {

	private Transport transport;

	private BatchStrategy strategy;

	private ByteArrayOutputStream byteStream = new ByteArrayOutputStream();

	public synchronized void send(Message message) throws IOException {
		strategy.newMessage(message);
		List buffered = strategy.getMessagesToSend();
		sendBuffer(buffered);
		strategy.sent();
	}

	private void sendBuffer(List buffer) throws IOException {
		for (Message each : buffer) {
			byte[] bytes = each.toBytes();
			byteStream.write(bytes);
		}
		byteStream.flush();
		transport.sendBytes(byteStream.toByteArray());
		byteStream.reset();
	}
}
package com.thinkinginobjects;

public class FixSizeBatchStrategy implements BatchStrategy {

	private static final int BATCH_SIZE = 0;
	private List buffer = new ArrayList();

	@Override
	public void newMessage(Message message) {
		buffer.add(message);
	}

	@Override
	public List getMessagesToSend() {
		if (buffer.size() == BATCH_SIZE) {
			return buffer;
		} else {
			return Collections.emptyList();
		}
	}

	@Override
	public void sent() {
		buffer.clear();
	}
}

The patch was successful, but two weeks later we figured out that we can batch the messages together in time slices and overwrite outdated messages with newer version in the same time slice. The solution was specific to our business domain of publishing market data.

More importantly, the OCP showed its benefits when we implemented the change. We only needed to extend the existing BatchStrategy interface with an different implementation. We didn’t change a single line of code but the spring configuration file.

package com.thinkinginobjects;

public class FixIntervalBatchStrategy implements BatchStrategy {

	private static final long INTERVAL = 5000;

	private List buffer = new ArrayList();

	private volatile boolean readyToSend;

	public FixIntervalBatchStrategy() {
		ScheduledExecutorService executorService = Executors.newScheduledThreadPool(1);
		executorService.scheduleAtFixedRate(new Runnable() {

			@Override
			public void run() {
				readyToSend = true;
			}
		}, 0, INTERVAL, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
	}

	@Override
	public void newMessage(Message message) {
		buffer.add(message);
	}

	@Override
	public List getMessagesToSend() {
		if (readyToSend) {
			List toBeSent = buffer;
			buffer = new ArrayList();
			return toBeSent;
		} else {
			return Collections.emptyList();
		}
	}

	@Override
	public void sent() {
		readyToSend = false;
		buffer.clear();
	}
}

* For the sake of simplicity, I left the message coalsecing logic out of the example.

Conclusion:
The Open-Closed Principle serves as an useful guidance for writing good quality module that is easy to change and maintain. We need to be careful not to create too many abstractions prematurely. It is worth to defer the creation of abstractions to the time when the change of requirement happens. However, when the changes strike, don’t hesitate to create an abstraction and make the module to confirm OCP. There is a great chance that a similar change of the same kind is at your door step.

References: [APPP] – Agile Software Development, Principles, Patterns, and Practices – Robert C Martin

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Abstract Factory in Domain Modelling

The Abstract Factory pattern is an important building block for Domain Modelling. It hides the complexity of creating a domain object from the caller of the factory. It also enables us to create domain objects those have complex dependencies without worrying about when and how to inject its dependencies.

It is easier to explain the idea with a concrete example. I used to work on a project to build a simple online booking system for a heath club. The heath club provides one-to-many training sessions. The club administrators schedule training sessions in advance and publish them on a web page. Each training session has limited space. Members can reserve space for one or many people against a training session as long as there are enough slots available. Members may cancel their reservations any time.

I am going to ignore the process of creating and displaying training sessions, but concentrate on the reservation process here.

I started by creating the domain objects first:

package com.thinkinginobjects.domain;

public class TrainingSession {

     private int totalCapacity;
     private List<Reservation> reserved;

     public TrainingSession(int totalSeats) {
          this.totalCapacity = totalSeats;
          this.reserved = new ArrayList<Reservation>();
     }

     public Reservation reserveSpace(long userId, int numberOfPeople) throws ReservationException {
          boolean available = seatsAvailable(numberOfPeople);
          if (available) {
               Reservation newReservation = new Reservation(userId, numberOfPeople);
               reserved.add(newReservation);
               newReservation.confirmed();
               return newReservation;
          } else {
               throw new ReservationException("No available space.");
          }
     }

     private boolean seatsAvailable(int requested) {
          int reservedCount = 0;
          for (Reservation each : reserved) {
               reservedCount += each.getOccupiedSeats();
          }
          return reservedCount + requested <= totalCapacity;
     }
}
package com.thinkinginobjects.domain;

public class Reservation {

     private long userId;
     private int numberOfPeople;
     private boolean cancelled;

     public Reservation(long userId, int numberOfPeople) {
          this.userId = userId;
          this.numberOfPeople = numberOfPeople;
          this.cancelled = false;
     }

     public void confirmed() {
     }

     public boolean bookedBy(long userId) {
          return this.userId == userId;
     }

     public int getOccupiedSeats() {
          if (cancelled) {
               return 0;
          } else {
               return numberOfPeople;
          }
     }

     public void cancel() {
          this.cancelled = true;
     }
}
package com.thinkinginobjects.service;

public class ReservationService {

     private TrainingSessionRepository trainingSessionRepository;
     private ReservationRepository reservationRepository;

     public void reserve(long userId, long sessionId, int numberOfPeople) throws ReservationException {
          TrainingSessionById query = new TrainingSessionById(sessionId);
          TrainingSession session = trainingSessionRepository.querySingle(query);
          session.reserveSpace(userId, numberOfPeople);
     }

     public void cancel(long userId, long sessionId) {
          Reservation reservation = reservationRepository.querySingle(new ReservationsByUserAndSession(userId, sessionId));
          reservation.cancel();
     }
}

When a member fills in the number of people and click “Reserve” button on a web page, the web servlet invokes ReservationService.reserve(), which simply delegate the request to TrainingSession. The TrainingSession creates a Reservation instance and remembers it for availability checking purpose.

If a member want to cancel a particular reservation, the system calls ReservationService.cancel(). Then the ReservationService finds the right reservation instance and delegate the cancellation to it.

Nice and simple. We are going to add more challenge by asking the system to send an email to a member when he make a reservation or cancel one.

A naive solution is to add the email logic to the ReservationService:

package com.thinkinginobjects.service;

public class BadReservationService {

     private TrainingSessionRepository trainingSessionRepository;
     private ReservationRepository reservationRepository;
     private EmailSender emailSender;

     public void reserve(long userId, long sessionId, int numberOfPeople) throws ReservationException {
          TrainingSessionById query = new TrainingSessionById(sessionId);
          TrainingSession session = trainingSessionRepository.querySingle(query);
          session.reserveSpace(userId, numberOfPeople);
          emailSender.send(userId, "Booking confirmed", String.format("Your booking has been confirmed."));

     }

     public void cancel(long userId, long sessionId) {
          Reservation reservation = reservationRepository.querySingle(new ReservationsByUserAndSession(userId, sessionId));
          reservation.cancel();
          emailSender.send(userId, "Booking cancelled", String.format("Your booking has been cancelled."));
     }
}

It is easy to add a reference of MailSender in ReservationService because the ReservationService is a singleton effectively. If I use spring to wire up my services, this may be as simple as adding a line of xml to my spring config file.

However this approach moves a part of the business logic into ReservationService. The domain logic is fragmented across the domain layer and the service layer. I much prefer to keep all business logic together in the domain model.

A better solution:

The Reservation class knows about the completion of reservation and cancellation. It is a good candidate to host the email logic.

package com.thinkinginobjects.domainalternative;

public class Reservation {

     private EmailSender mailSender;

     private long id;
     private long userId;
     private int numberOfPeople;
     private boolean cancelled;

     public Reservation(long reservationId, long userId, int numberOfPeople, EmailSender mailSender) {
          this.userId = userId;
          this.numberOfPeople = numberOfPeople;
          this.cancelled = false;
          this.mailSender = mailSender;
     }

     public void confirmed() {
          mailSender.send(userId, "Booking confirmed", String.format("Your booking has been confirmed, your booking id is %s", id));
     }

     public boolean bookedBy(long userId) {
          return this.userId == userId;
     }

     public int getOccupiedSeats() {
          if (cancelled) {
               return 0;
          } else {
               return numberOfPeople;
          }
     }

     public void cancel() {
          this.cancelled = true;
          mailSender.send(userId, "Booking cancelled", String.format("Your booking %s has been cancelled.", id));
     }
}

However the TrainingSession is no longer able to create a Reservation instance because it cannot provide MailSender’s reference. The TraininSession does not use MailSender directly. I don’t want the TraininSession to carry a reference to MailSender around for the sole purpose of passing it to Reservation’s constructor.

The Abstract Factory pattern comes to solve my problem. Instead of instantiating a Reservation directly, the TrainingSession can use a ReservationFactory to create an instance of Reservation, passing in only the relevant business information. The actual implementation of ReservationFactory has a reference to MailSender, which the factory use to construct Reservation instances.

package com.thinkinginobjects.domainalternative;

public interface ReservationFactory {

     Reservation create(long userId, int numberOfPeople);

}
package com.thinkinginobjects.domainalternative;

import com.thinkinginobjects.domain.ReservationException;

public class TrainingSession {

     private int totalCapacity;
     private List<Reservation> reserved;
     private ReservationFactory reservationFactory;

     public TrainingSession(int totalSeats) {
          this.reserved = new ArrayList<Reservation>();
     }

     public Reservation reserveSpace(long userId, int numberOfPeople) throws ReservationException {
          boolean available = seatsAvailable(numberOfPeople);
          if (available) {
               Reservation newReservation = reservationFactory.create(userId, numberOfPeople); // Use factory instead of "new"
               reserved.add(newReservation);
               newReservation.confirmed();
               return newReservation;
          } else {
               throw new ReservationException("No available space.");
          }
     }

     private boolean seatsAvailable(int requested) {
          int reservedCount = 0;
          for (Reservation each : reserved) {
               reservedCount += each.getOccupiedSeats();
          }
          return reservedCount + requested <= totalCapacity;
     }
}
package com.thinkinginobjects.servicealternative;

public class ReservationFactoryImpl implements ReservationFactory{

     private IdAllocator idAllocator;
     private EmailSender mailSender;

     @Override
     public Reservation create(long userId, int numberOfPeople) {
          long newId = idAllocator.allocate();
          return new Reservation(newId, userId, numberOfPeople, mailSender);
     }
}

The factory is also a good place to generate a unique id for a new Reservation. In the example, the factory implementation use an IdAllocator to create new ids based on a sequence table in the database.

The factory is an interface, which makes easier to mock it up when unit testing domain objects. The factory should be treat as a part of the Domain model and we are safe to let other domain objects to depend on it.

The factory also decouples the caller from the actual type of the factory product. If we expand the use case further to distinguish cancellable and non-cancellable reservations, the abstract factory can instantiate different subclasses of the Reservation for different scenarios, and hide all the details from the caller at the same time.

Conclusion:

The Abstract Factory plays an important role in Domain modelling. The key benefits are:

  • Hide the details of creating a complex domain object.
  • Enables one domain object to create another object without worrying about its dependencies.
  • Factory can produce instances of different classes for different use cases.

The factory interface belongs to the domain model. It is used by other domain objects. It worth to consider it even just for dependency injection and id generation purpose.